Y2K, rapture, 2012…the apocalypse

Graphic+by+Aaron+Newman
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Y2K, rapture, 2012…the apocalypse

Graphic by Aaron Newman

Graphic by Aaron Newman

Graphic by Aaron Newman

Graphic by Aaron Newman

By Jeannine Englander

Graphic by Aaron Newman

Apocalypse, Armageddon, zombie invasion, and Doomsday are just a few terms that come to mind when you hear “2012,” otherwise known as “the end of the world.” The buzz that our world will end in December of 2012 has quickly increased as the date gets closer. Influence from the media with movies like “The Road,” “2012,” and even comedies like “Zombieland” make it pretty hard to ignore what some people believe to be the end.

Remember that whole Y2K problem in 2000, and the recent “Rapture”? Civilization didn’t end up seeing its final days, and the giant meteor that everyone has been talking about for years still hasn’t hit us. People started worrying about the apocalypse when Mayan calendars with hieroglyphics were found that supposedly “ended” sometime in December of 2012. Archaeologists recently found that this is not the case when they discovered the oldest version of ancient Mayan calendars to date, deep in the Guatemalan rainforest. These calendars, painted on the walls of Mayan structures, merely hold such complex hieroglyphs that scientists couldn’t decipher beyond dates that are in our near future. Despite this, some say that the earth will see the final effects of global warming or another ice age, but there are still lingering doubts that these things are possible, or at least could happen so soon.

Senior Mari Lillestol’s is skeptical. “I don’t believe in it. I think people got really carried away with the idea and are trying to make a lot of money from the survival kits and bunkers. People are crazy,” she said.

Others, like senior Lena Geupel, feel differently, “I believe it. I just do. I just have a feeling.”

For senior Jackson Lundgren, the contrast is even greater. “My family is completely prepared for any apocalyptic situation or natural disaster. We have 50 pounds of beans and 50 pounds of rice under [my brother] Miles’s bed, we have gas masks, 200 gallons of fresh water, 100 gallons of diesel fuel and 100 gallons of gas. Our house in McCloud is also industrial grade to sustain any type of storm,” he said.

Just one year ago, in May 2011, The U.S. Center for Disease Control released an emergency preparedness bulletin that provides tips for protecting yourself against a zombie invasion. It revealed that the government is ready to deal with this civilization-threatening problem if and when it arises. It suggests that citizens “make an emergency kit,” “plan an evacuation route” and “sit down with your family to come up with a plan if zombies start appearing on your doorstep.”

If this isn’t enough, companies like Gerber are selling Apocalypse Kits for $350 with a lifetime warranty. The description of the kit mentions that “To beat the uprising we must work together… your best chance lies in the Gerber Apocalypse Survival Kit.” A recent edit on the website notes that due to very high demand, Gerber is currently halting sales of the kit. In case you’re curious, yes; it does include a Gator Machete Pro and LMF II Infantry.

Last year, following the devastating earthquake in Japan, a company called Vivos started to receive thousands of applications for rooms in their 200-person doomsday bunkers. Their website says, “Millions of people believe that we are living in the ‘end times.’ It’s time to prepare!”

We seniors are lucky to be getting out of Tam soon to experience the real world before it potentially blows to pieces, but for the rest of Tam students, you’ll just have to wait and see. This may just be the best excuse for procrastination yet.