Dress Code and New Absence Policy Enforced

HALL+MONITOR%3A+A+new+district+policy+proposes+that+unexcused+absences+can+no+longer+lower+students%27+grades.+Photo+by%3A+Sophia+Ellingson
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Dress Code and New Absence Policy Enforced

HALL MONITOR: A new district policy proposes that unexcused absences can no longer lower students' grades. Photo by: Sophia Ellingson

HALL MONITOR: A new district policy proposes that unexcused absences can no longer lower students' grades. Photo by: Sophia Ellingson

HALL MONITOR: A new district policy proposes that unexcused absences can no longer lower students' grades. Photo by: Sophia Ellingson

HALL MONITOR: A new district policy proposes that unexcused absences can no longer lower students' grades. Photo by: Sophia Ellingson

By Sammy Herdman & Emily Long

The administration has instituted new policies this school year, including a new unexcused absence policy and stricter enforcement of the dress code.

The unexcused absence policy states that after one unexcused absence, parents will be contacted and the student will meet with a campus staff assistant. On the second offense in the same class, students will get a detention and parents will be contacted again. On the third in that class, the student will have to meet with an administrator and a parent.

“The main idea behind the detentions is to get the students to change their behavior,” Assistant Principal Brian Lynch said. Last year, unexcused absences only resulted in loss of credit at the end of the semester at the teacher’s discretion.

Many students are unconvinced that the new absence policy is really beneficial.

“I think in [the admin’s] mind, it’s a good idea,” junior Emma Sell said. “But as a student it’s kind of a pain because it’s harder to clear absences. I think kids will just find other ways around it.”

The new dress code enforcement is directed at changing school culture and eliminating distracting garments from the classroom. “Things will always get harder before they get easier when you start enforcing things that previously were not enforced,” Assistant Principal Kim Stiffler said.

Many students and staff are relieved by the change, such as junior Julia Simmons. “I am so sick of seeing people dressed distastefully. It is distracting,” Simmons said.

Principal Julie Synyard said the changes that need to be made are different for boys and girls.

“From what I have seen with guys, we are mainly dealing with alcohol or drug references on their shirts, sometimes language,” Synyard said. “With the girls, it’s mainly short shorts and half shirts.”

According to Synyard, the dress code is meant to emulate real life. “We want to prepare [students] for their future jobs. We want them to respect themselves, each other, and their bodies,” Synyard said. “Everything starts with modeling [appropriate dress].”