As portrayed in this month’s feature, Tam’s Running for Change program aims to assist kids that are struggling either academically or in life, and help them use running as a tool to better themselves. It is rare to see a high school program with such an overwhelming impact on students’ lives both inside and outside the classroom, and heartening to see a small but dedicated group of students take on a challenge with such enthusiasm. We would like to congratulate Isais Franco and his students for their effort and wish them luck in accomplishing their goal of running a half marathon in London this June. Franco’s class focuses on incorporating life skills into the cirriculum of mandatory courses  in order to blend academic and personal development. Whether or not Franco’s students in these classes pursue higher education, they have been equipped with the necessary skills to navigate their future after Tam. While in this instance, the addition of practical skills to the regular curriculum is geared to assist a students with difficulties, we would like to see this effort being made on a wider scale in all of our classes.

As portrayed in this month’s feature, Tam’s Running for Change program aims to assist kids that are struggling either academically or in life, and help them use running as a tool to better themselves. It is rare to see a high school program with such an overwhelming impact on students’ lives both inside and outside the classroom, and heartening to see a small but dedicated group of students take on a challenge with such enthusiasm. We would like to congratulate Isais Franco and his students for their effort and wish them luck in accomplishing their goal of running a half marathon in London this June. Franco’s class focuses on incorporating life skills into the cirriculum of mandatory courses in order to blend academic and personal development. Whether or not Franco’s students in these classes pursue higher education, they have been equipped with the necessary skills to navigate their future after Tam. While in this instance, the addition of practical skills to the regular curriculum is geared to assist a students with difficulties, we would like to see this effort being made on a wider scale in all of our classes.

As students, a question we commonly ask in class is, “when am I ever going to use this?” Although learning for learning’s sake is absolutely important, especially for personal and intellectual growth and development, there are many skills, such as basic financial management, that can be easily integrated into our classroom environment.

There are already lots of skills learned in school that we utilize every day outside of the classroom setting, but as classes become more advanced and the concepts more theoretical, it’s easy to lose sight of the true value of learning life skills and tools for personal growth. So while it may be easy to understand how basic essay writing will be useful in a variety of contexts, many of us fear that we won’t be equipped with the appropriate life skills such as how to register to vote and work closely with others once we finish our educations and emerge into the “real world.”

Often, the subjects we’re already learning about in class can go hand in hand with practical life skills, and be integrated into our current curriculum. How to balance your checkbook or file your taxes are not listed on any syllabus, but taking one class period out of the year to teach us these things could save a lot of confusion down the line and make the transition into adulthood that much easier. Additionally, many students would find such lessons interesting as well as informative.

The American school system tends to prioritize education and the purely intellectual development of adolescents in the traditional K-12 school format. But there are skills, both practical and personal necessary for a person to learn before they can become a full-fledged member of society. It’s not to say that there aren’t programs already in place at Tam that teach these skills. Most Government classes focus on citizenship and civic responsibility. Some math teachers add mini-units about using Excel and the benefits of investing. History teachers often incorporate current events and connect them to historical ones. These examples of teachers trying combine intellectual growth and practical knowledge should be commended. If activities like Running for Change can be organically incorporated into more classes, Tam’s student body could be better prepared as a whole to be successful in whatever future they choose.

As students, a question we commonly ask in class is, “when am I ever going to use this?” Although learning for learning’s sake is absolutely important, especially for personal and intellectual growth and development, there are many skills, such as basic financial management, that can be easily integrated into our classroom environment.  There are already lots of skills learned in school that we utilize every day outside of the classroom setting, but as classes become more advanced and the concepts more theoretical, it’s easy to lose sight of the true value of learning life skills and tools for personal growth.  So while it may be easy to understand how basic essay writing will be useful in a variety of contexts, many of us fear that we won’t be equipped with the appropriate life skills such as how to register to vote and work closely with others once we finish our educations and emerge into the “real world.” Often, the subjects we’re already learning about in class can go hand in hand with practical life skills, and be integrated into our current curriculum. How to balance your checkbook or file your taxes are not listed on any syllabus, but taking one class period out of the year to teach us these things could save a lot of confusion down the line and make the transition into adulthood that much easier.

Additionally, many students would find such lessons interesting as well as informative. The American school system tends to prioritize education and the purely intellectual development of adolescents in the traditional K-12 school format. But there are skills, both practical and personal necessary for a person to learn before they can become a full-fledged member of society. It’s not to say that there aren’t programs already in place at Tam that teach these skills. Most Government classes focus on citizenship and civic responsibility. Some math teachers add mini-units about using Excel and the benefits of investing. History teachers often incorporate current events and connect them to historical ones. These examples of teachers trying combine intellectual growth and practical knowledge should be commended. If activities like Running for Change can be organically incorporated into more classes, Tam’s student body could be better prepared as  a whole to be successful in whatever future they choose.♦

 

Opinion
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